Chasing Failure

I’ve thought a lot about failure throughout teaching and throughout my life.  Failure, or the fear of it, keeps a perfectionist from doing things.  “I might fail,” the little voice echoes.  But, I might not.  Failure always feels so final. Like the death of a dream.

Now failure has become trendy.  Pushing back against the idea that education should be a one-and-done box to check of mastery that either gets an A plus of success… or worse… failure. Failure is even kind of becoming a buzz word of sorts.  Posters hang in schools that say, “Failure happens here.”   While it’s good that we’re opening the door to different thinking, maybe failure isn’t what we’re after.

Failure is the wrong thing to chase.

Chase risk.

Chase problem solving.

Chase the struggle.

Chase learning at all costs. Relentlessly. Planned and unplanned. Big and small. Joyful and hard. Fun and full of friction. Real.

Failure is an end point. A red-F on a test. A “you failed” message that doesn’t continue.

But risk? Problem solving? Struggle? Those things are all made to continue.  The mere weight of the word “failure” can carry a strong message.  But the idea that the beauty of true learning is in the struggle?  That’s it.  We don’t need to chase opportunities for our kids to fail big, but we need to allow them to struggle with the possibility of failing always being, well, a possibility.  We need to avoid rescuing them.  We need to teach them to have a mindset of optimism, resilience, and let go while they strengthen their toolkit in their own ways.

It’s not the chasing of failure, it’s everything else. Because life?  It’s made of everything else.

 

Ebb and Flow Magic

Ocean waves.  They swell, roll in, and crash.. recede.  Some big, some small. The conditions of the environment wreak havoc on the waves.

Learning comes in waves. You get in the flow, ideas coming, things working… then it recedes. Sometimes the wave fizzles and the thing just doesn’t come to fruition. Sometimes, you ride the wave, all the way, and it’s the best feeling in the world.  Success.  But the truth is, we’d never have the flow without the ebb.

So much of the work that happens in classrooms around the world is more of a faucet.  A steady, over controlled stream.  No ebb, no flow, just a stream.   We try to turn it on, turn if off. Stop. Start. Measure.  That squelches all the great things that the ebb and flow teach us. Riding waves requires resilience, persistence, courage, collaboration, risk-taking, adapting… and so much more.  Things that can’t be replicated in a predictable faucet stream. Things that will always rely on ebb and flow to take shape.

The more I read about creativity and design and what making is about, the more I experience, the more I appreciate the ebb and flow. We know we can’t control the ocean, but we sometimes think we can control learning.  We reduce it to a thing and it loses it’s glorious messy process.  An ocean without waves? It would lose it’s magic. Ebb and flow magic.

 

 

 

Stay Afraid

We seek comfort.  It’s why I love familiar food, holiday traditions, and wearing pajama pants more often than real clothes on holiday break.  It’s why I like rewatching Breaking Bad for about the fourth time.  It’s why I open Photoshop instead of Illustrator when I want to draw.   It’s why I love weekends that start off with a warm cup of coffee on a Saturday morning.

Those moments counteract the fear.  But the lingering fear, “What if I stop improving?” counteracts it all.  Pushes and pulls.    Change is inevitable.  Really letting go of our own fears means really truly embracing that intuition inside of us all.  Not just cracking the door open, but putting down a “Bring It On,” welcome mat.  Because maybe the fear in our head is there to push us in the right direction. Afraid? You should be.

If we live believing that each of us, in our own small way, is a message to the universe we might all head in the direction we need to.  A message to improve ourselves, step by step, day by day, and push past the fear.  If we do?  We become what the world needs.   We find true joy.  We don’t win, there is no prize.  The ‘prize’ is the thing that you can’t hold onto that you find on the other side of fear.

But if we stay afraid?  None of us can afford to take that chance.

There will be no resolutions for 2017 for me.  No “one word.”  The only thing I will make?

A list of things I’ve always wanted to do but have never done.  Developing my own photographs from a film camera.  Self publish a book.Build something out of wood, from scratch and actually use it. Vacation somewhere nature-ish without wifi.  I may add more, or I may not. I’m not afraid that the list is incomplete, I’m only afraid that I may not get started on it.

Conquering these things aren’t like ‘giant spider fear’ conquering.  They are worse.  They are about conquering yourself, and then enjoying a day in pajama pants to celebrate.

Sew Many Adventures Ahead

There is nothing like it really.  The pride on a kid’s face when he or she has created something.  It doesn’t matter WHAT it is.  It could be a cardboard sculpture. It could be a light up bracelet. It could be a new invention that simply didn’t exist yesterday.  But the second the chance arrives to SHARE their designs with others, and even better, allow their design to HELP another person?  School just became the motivating and engaging learning environment that kids deserve.

I thought it was just the magic of cardboard, but this past week, I learned it was more.  It’s personal.  It’s learning and creating.   The little turquoise sewing machines in our learning space were brought to life.   Our students that use our space are PreK to 4th graders, so we chose the small machines because they are little, portable, very safe, and do the basics needed.

Why sewing?

  • Authentic use of math including measurement, counting, fractions, decimals, perimeter, and area.
  • Critical thinking about settings and stitches.
  • Problem solving to troubleshoot. .
  • Fine motor skills to load the thread or complete with hand-stitching.
  • Room to grow… persevere. Be resilient.
  • The machine becomes a place to collaborate.  Kids love to help each other learn.
  • Our future is in fibers and wearable devices and sewing to create our own wearables is going to become essential.
  • Machine stitching has many curricular uses, such as to create and publish books.
  • Use conductive thread in a machine to create light up designs and practice circuitry.
  • Take design thinking prototyping to the next level when using a wider variety of textiles for more flexibility.
  • Practice using patterns to develop skills in multi-step projects.
  • Decisions like: Should I use duct-tape for this? Should I stitch it by hand? Would the machine stitch be better?”

We have to take our students beyond saving a file in MSWord and farther than typing in a Google Doc.  It’s not that technology skills don’t matter… it’s that technology is SO much bigger than software on computers or iPads.  Technology is about using devices to create our own version of our story, interpreted from our minds, through our hearts, right down through our fingers.  Laser cutting, 3d design, and even sewing.

Our sewing adventures are just in the beginning stages, but I already see the value in our little blue machines. It took one moment to hook me in… a kid was threading the machine and it was challenging the first time… the student looked at me and said, “I’m NOT giving up on this.”

I’m working on some graphics to make our machine more accessible to our kiddos and I’m sharing, because making is all about collaboration.  Download a PDF  of the two files below. 

 

 

7 Questions I Ask About a Makerspace Tool Before I Embrace It

With the advertisement of maker-this and maker-that, there are a flood of products claiming to be the “next big thing” you need in your makerspace.  I’ve tried some things I love, somethings I thought fell short, and I’m constantly on the lookout for new ideas, new gadgets, and new ways to use old things.

Screen Shot 2016-04-23 at 9.07.55 AM1.) USE: Is this tool versatile?  Can it be used in an open ended way?

2.) GROWTH: Can this tool grow with the students?

3.) CHALLENGE: Is it going to offer hard fun?  Is it a challenge?

4.) STUDENT-DRIVEN: Is it going to offer a fully student-driven experience?  Or will it require a teacher to be in charge of it always?

5.) SOFTWARE/APP: Does it work with only one type of software or app? Does that app allow for open creation?

6.) CURRICULUM: Can it’s use be tied into existing curriculum for classroom experiences?

7.) QUALITY: Rechargeable? Sturdy? Is it going to hold up with multiple uses and a variety of kids tinkering with it or is it easy for kids to create with it?

I’m always looking at products and mentally scoring them… looking for a yes to the questions above.  According to my questions, a hammer is a 7-star item!  On the other hand, a set of robotic cubes I was SUPER excited about turned out to be so limited, they rarely left the shelf.   Looking at the questions? It’s a 2-star (2 yes answers only).  That doesn’t mean the product wasn’t fun, but it means it’s not fun for very long… or challenging.  I know making is NOT about the stuff, but the stuff we stock our spaces with should stoke the fires of creativity.

It’s so important that you KNOW your students on a personal level, because their questions and creative ideas will guide what’s needed in the learning space.  The kids favorite things in our space continue to be the found materials like cardboard, beads, pipe cleaners, and cardboard tubes.   If several years ago, someone offered me a choice between a box of cardboard tubes or robotic cubes, I would have laughed and grabbed the cubes.  Now I’m not so sure.  Slowing down and thinking about how materials are used can help guide us to make the right choices, and in the end, make the best space possible for our students.