One mission I have when teaching young children is helping them understand the different type of image files and discussions about file extensions.  The topics of .gif and .jpeg lead to great discussion about animated vs. non-animated images.  File extensions can help students think about different programs and what type of files are needed or created.   Understanding image resolution helps them create higher quality media that doesn’t contain pixelated images.

Enter this tweet.   The idea?

  1. Start with an image.
  2. Change the file extension  from JPEG to TXT.
  3. Edit bits of code in the image. Copy/paste. Delete characters. Be experimental. There is no guide.
  4. Change the extension back to a JPEG.
  5. Open your photo to view the results.

I love that this simple and quick activity also reinforces the idea that images are made of code.  Seeing how every single characters together in hundreds of lines creates the picture.  Pretty cool!

Photo edits could become framed works of art. Backgrounds for poetry. Parts of a student made book.  The possibilities are endless.

I decided to try it out with a photo from a spring break visit to Austin.  A red poppy.  After the text code edits?  It’s a glitchy photograph that is a whole new way to view a poppy. It’s messy, unpredictable, and a work of art.  It’s all about the process of the code lines coming together. Just like learning.